Maintaining of a Thatched Roof

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Thatched roofs are purely a product of England, created by our ancestors during the days of old, thatched roofs were used because of the insulation properties. The style remains popular to this day for the same reason. Tiled or slated roofs often need insulation well as the roof itself, whereas a thatched roof deals with both responsibilities effortlessly.

Why Have a Thatched Roof?

Of course, many have a roof designed to their own preferences, so it’s not to say that a thatched roof is for everyone, but there are a number of benefits in having a thatched roof.

One benefit is the ecological qualities. That is a carbon-neutral material so doesn’t require a lot of energy to be grown. Having a thatched roof also benefits agricultural communities, as it keeps the skill of thatch making alive.

Some may be dissuaded from having a thatched roof due to it being a potential fire hazard, but thatched roof these days are just as safe as any other roof made from slate or tile. Safety regulations have moved on since the early days, and modern regulations state that a thatched roof must have a fire-retardant board put beneath it. This makes the property much safer in the event of a fire.

There is also the charm that a thatched roof gives a property. It gives a house a sense of character as well as giving visitors a hint of nostalgia. Thatch also blends in with its surrounding environment as it ages, meaning that your house really becomes as one with nature.

How Do You Maintain a Thatched Roof?

That naturally degrades over a period of time, so it’s important to know what to look out for in order for your roof to be maintained.

The roof should always be monitored for any changes, but the winter months should call for more checks. There are a number of factors that make up what kind of work needs to be carried out on the roof. The ridge of the thatch normally needs replacing every ten to fifteen years. The coat work will vary depending on a number of factors, such as the brand used and the lifespan associated with it.

The roof should be kept dry where possible. Of course, this can be difficult if it is raining, but once the rain has finished, be sure to move any obstructions that could hinder the roof drying. If a thatched roof cannot be dried properly, it is likely to accumulate moss and algae, which will only keep the roof wet moving forwards.

A thatched roof should not experience any damage from the elements, but from time to time, holes can appear within the roof. Patching is normally used to repair these holes, and is normally done using the same material as the coat work. Speak to a company experience in thatched roof repairs if the problem is too big to tackle yourself.

Overall, maintaining a thatched roof is about attention to detail and understanding the life span of thatch. Once you have all the relevant information to hand, you too can enjoy the benefits a thatched roof has to offer.